Last edited by Zulkigar
Friday, August 7, 2020 | History

2 edition of Navaho witchcraft found in the catalog.

Navaho witchcraft

Clyde Kluckhohn

Navaho witchcraft

by Clyde Kluckhohn

  • 114 Want to read
  • 4 Currently reading

Published by Beacon Press in Boston, Mass .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Navajo Indians.,
  • Indian magic -- North America.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Clyde Kluckhohn.
    SeriesPapers of the Peabody Museum of American Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University -- vol. 22, no. 2.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination254 p.
    Number of Pages254
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14069861M

    He was in almost continuous contact with the Navaho Indians beginning in In he became an expert consultant to the United States Office of Indian Affairs. Professor Kluckholn authored several books, among them Beyond the Rainbow and Navaho Witchcraft. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Kluckhohn, Clyde, Navaho witchcraft. Cambridge, Mass., The Museum, (OCoLC) Document Type.

    Book description Witchcraft is defined by Clyde Kluckhohn () as "the influencing of events by super-natural techniques that are socially disapproved," and his description and analysis of Navaho ideas and actions related to witchcraft illuminate the ways in which society deals with the ambition for power, the aggressiveness, and the /5. Product Information. Witchcraft is defined by Clyde Kluckhohn () as "the influencing of events by super-natural techniques that are socially disapproved," and his description and analysis of Navaho ideas and actions related to witchcraft illuminate the ways in which society deals with the ambition for power, the aggressiveness, and the anxiety of its members.

    OCLC Number: Notes: "An Ariadne book." Description: xxii, pages ; 21 cm. Contents: Biographical introduction / by Talcott Parsons and Evon Z. Vogt --Key to the phonetic spelling of Navaho words / by Herbert Landar --pt. I. Data --General discussion of data --The distinct categories of witchcraft --Witchery way and were-animals --Sorcery --Wizardry - . The book Malleus Maleficarum stated that witches: Since the Navaho witch is a personification of evil, witchcraft serves to culturally define immoral and antisocial behavior. True. In many parts of Africa today, AIDS is being blamed on the activity of witchcraft. True.


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Navaho witchcraft by Clyde Kluckhohn Download PDF EPUB FB2

Kluckhohn began collecting reports of Navajo witchcraft in the late s gathering data from many individuals. He describes four types of witchcraft. (One wonders if the wide spread distribution of Dene effected the diversity.)/5(8).

(Navajo is the This is an ethnography of Clyde Kluckhohn of witchcraft of Navaho. As an anthropologist, Kluckhohn was interested in understanding the misunderstanding within cultures to possibly avoid conflicts because he was horrified of the violence and destruction of humans has done during the World Wars/5.

Probably the only book in existence that covers the beliefs and legends told by the old Navajo leaders. This book was first publishedbut the information contained was gathered over a thirty year period/5(6). First published inClyde Kluckhohn's Navajo Witchcraft offers a comprehensive analysis of witchcraft tradition in Navajo culture.

As the main research source, 93 informants were interviewed by Kluckhohn. Among the sample, 76 people were men, 71 /5(6). Kluckhohn began collecting reports of Navajo witchcraft in the late s gathering data from many individuals.

He describes four types of witchcraft. (One wonders if the wide spread distribution of Dene effected the diversity.)/5(6). Witchcraft is defined by Clyde Kluckhohn () as "the influencing of events by super-natural techniques that are socially disapproved," and his description and analysis of Navaho.

Navaho witchcraft by Kluckhohn, Clyde Kay Maben. Publication date Topics Magie navaho, Superstitions, Magie navaho -- États-Unis (Nouveau Sud-Ouest), Superstitions -- États-Unis (Nouveau Sud-Ouest) Publisher Internet Archive Books. Scanned in China. Uploaded by AltheaB on Octo SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata) Pages: True story of Navajo woman that "battles the evil Navajo spirit night being, skinwalker, and withcraft on the Navajo reservation." and ".organizes the new information discovered about the skinwalker, witchcraft, and related spiritual phenomena.

Read more Read less click to /5(5). Navajo Witchcraft In his book Navajo Witchcraft, anthropologist Clyde Kluckhohn lists the four "Ways" of the Navajo witch as follows.

Witchery Way focuses on corpses in all of their rituals and ceremonies. Sorcery Way involves burying a victims' personal objects or body parts (like hair) during ceremonies. The Witchery Way is the best known form of Navajo witchcraft and, much like other Ways, it is handed down by the elders of the tribe to those who want to learn it.

Each form of witchcraft is based on death, with the Witchery Way focused on corpses. The most well known Navajo witches are called Skinwalkers. The website has a very informative page on Navajo witchcraft, they state: The four basic “ways” of Navajo witchcraft are, “Witchery, Sorcery, Wizardry and Frenzy.” None of the four are actually witchcraft in the European sense of the word.

They are simply additional parts of the vast spirituality of the Navajo people. Navaho Witchcraft by Kluckhohn, Clyde and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at NAVAHO WITCHCRAFT by CLYDE KLUCKHOHN and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at   “As such, witchcraft has long been part of their culture, history, and traditions.” Skinwalkers are very dangerous but can be identified if the unwary know where to look.

The Navajo term for them is “yee naaldlooshii”: “with it, he. Navajo culture is quite intact and the tribe is making every effort to ensure that that continues in enduring fashion. Navajo traditional medicine -- good medicine -- is very real indeed.

A Navajo medicine man often trains for as many as seventeen rigorous years. Very real as well, unfortunately, is Navajo witch-craft -- bad medicine While perhaps the most common variety seen in horror fiction by non-Navajo people, the yee naaldlooshii is one of several varieties of Navajo witch, specifically a type of ’ánti’įhnii.

Corpse powder or corpse poison (Navajo: áńt’į́, literally "witchery" or "harming") is a substance made from powdered corpses. The powder is used by witches to curse their victims. Skinwalker, a Navajo Witch In the Navajo culture, a skinwalker is a type of harmful witch who has the ability to turn into, possess, or disguise themselves as an animal.

This witch is called “yee naaldlooshii” by the Navajo, which translates to “with it, he goes on all fours.”. Witchcraft is defined by Clyde Kluckhohn () as "the influencing of events by super-natural techniques that are socially disapproved," and his description and analysis of Navaho ideas and actions related to witchcraft illuminate the ways in which society deals with the ambition for power, the aggressiveness, and the anxiety of its :   Witchcraft is defined by Clyde Kluckhohn () as "the influencing of events by super-natural techniques that are socially disapproved," and his description and analysis of Navaho ideas and actions related to witchcraft illuminate the ways in which society deals with the ambition for power, the aggressiveness, and the anxiety of its members/5(41).

Navaho Witchcraft Witchcraft is defined by Clyde Kluckhohn () as "the influencing of events by super-natural techniques that are socially disapproved," and his description and analysis of Navaho ideas and actions related to witchcraft illuminate the ways in which society deals with the ambition for power, the aggressiveness, and.

Anthony Grove "Tony" Hillerman ( – Octo ) was an American author of detective novels and non-fiction works best known for his Navajo Tribal Police mystery novels. Several of his works have been adapted as theatrical and television movies.

2 Recognition beyond the US. 3 Legacy and honors. Leaphorn and Chee en: 6 including Anne Hillerman. Julian H. Steward; Navaho Witchcraft.

By Clyde Kluckhohn. Cambridge: Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University, pp. $, SociAuthor: Julian H. Steward.Navaho Witchcraft by Kluckhohn, Clyde and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at - Navaho Witchcraft by Kluckhohn, Clyde - AbeBooks Passion for books.